Tag Archives: Malware

Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware

Malware

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

Imagine a job that changes every day of your life, where you get to do something new each week – that’s what it’s like working in the cybersecurity industry. For me, this is ideal—smarter adversaries, new challenges, and the constant struggle to predict and prepare for the future of security in information technology makes this feel a lot less like work. However, it’s important to remember that we do this only because people are getting hurt, often literally. And that’s a sobering and humbling perspective. In many scenarios, a successful campaign can have drastic effects on the victims’ lifestyles and finances. In today’s example, the victims, point-of-sale systems, are being attacked by a POS malware and are being targeted for identity and financial theft.

This particular attack leveraged a POS malware dubbed UDPoS, aptly named for its somewhat uncommon data exfiltration method over UDP, specifically via DNS queries. Although this malware is definitely not the first of its kind (see Multigrain POS malware, DNSMessenger), it certainly is an uncommon technique, and intelligent in that many organizations deprioritize DNS traffic for inspection as compared to HTTP and FTP. Coupled with the fact that UDPoS allegedly leverages a popular remote desktop service known as LogMeIn, and you have a malware campaign that could have a broad reach of victims (in this case unpatched or dated POS systems), and a unique ability to avoid detection for data exfiltration.

Although uncommon, and perhaps somewhat covert in its ability to transmit data over DNS, this malware does offer an upside for defenders — attackers will continue to use protocols which do not employ encryption. The move to SSL or other encryption methods for data exfiltration has been surprisingly inconsistent, meaning detection is relatively simple. This makes the need for communication and visibility of these kinds of techniques essential.

As defenders, McAfee’s Advanced Threat Research team actively monitors the threat landscape and tracks both new and current techniques for every stage of malware—from reconnaissance to infection, lateral movement, persistence, command and control, and exfiltration. We will stay closely tuned to determine if this technique grows in popularity or evolves in capabilities.

We are constantly playing a game of cat and mouse with the adversaries. As we adapt, protect, and attempt to predict new methods of malicious activity, we can be certain the same efforts are being made to evade and outsmart us. Our challenge as a security community is to work together, learn from each other, and apply these learnings toward recognizing and mitigating new threats, such as the DNS exfiltration method employed by UDPoS.

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog

Share Your Heart, Not Your Identity: Here’s How You Can Stay Safe on Valentine’s Day

protecting-your-identity-online

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

I love Valentine’s day, it’s the one day of the year exclusively dedicated to sharing: we share our feelings, our affection, and special gifts with our loved ones. It’s a great time to show the people in our lives just how much they mean to us. Thanks to social media and mobile friendly retailers, giving your loved ones the world is just a few clicks away.

Tech devices have made it so much easier to share our hearts with the people we care about. But, could our emotional vulnerability ultimately leave us vulnerable to cyber-attacks? Historically, Valentine’s day has been a big day for cybercrime. Criminals have found clever ways to take advantage of retail, online dating platforms, and social media to launch attacks against romantic hopefuls. If you’re wondering how to avoid the most common V-day scams, here are a few things to remember when sharing the love online, and some useful tips to keep your precious data safe.

Dating Apps Are a Data Goldmine

Apps like Tinder or Zoosk are very attractive to hackers around this time of year. Considering the amount of intimate details shared on these platforms, dating apps are prime targets for cybercriminals looking to gain access to personal data and even payment information. In fact, online dating has seen a growing number of cyber-threats since 2015.

If you’re wondering “what’s the worst that could happen if my Tinder account is hacked?”, look no further than the hundreds of pages of data that the app keeps stored on its users. This particular dating app doesn’t just match singles looking to spark a connection, it also collects behavioral data, such as how often you connect, when and where you connect, and even your “likes” and posts from other associated accounts. Some of this data might seem trivial to unsuspecting users, but if placed in the wrong hands this information could be detrimental to the security of your identity.

Florist Are a Favorite for Phishing Scams

A bright, beautiful bouquet of roses is my favorite gift to receive when February 14th rolls around. Unsurprisingly, flowers make one of the most common gifts given around Valentine’s Day but, sending and receiving flowers may not be as harmless as it seems. In 2016, cybercriminals leveraged the popularity of flower services to attack unsuspecting vendors through a series of DDoS attacks designed to extort money from them. While these attacks did not result in leaked information, it’s important to be cautious of which vendors you allow to keep your credit card information on file. After all, you’re expecting your florist to deliver an assortment of beautiful flowers, not a bouquet of personal data to cyber criminals!

If an attack on your friendly florist isn’t enough to peak your senses, hackers have also been known to take advantage of admirers looking to send flowers. Cybercriminals prey on the likelihood that you’ve sent flowers to your loved ones to launch phishing scams, using bogus packages and “Failure to Deliver” notices to collect your data.

Social Media Isn’t Always Your “Friend” 

Valentine’s day is easily one of the most socially sharable days of the year. With so much love in the air, you can’t help but share pictures and posts about your loved ones with other friends and family online. Although most people associate cyber-attacks with some form of malware, many do not realize how vulnerable they are when sharing personal information on social media. Through social engineering, hackers use the information you share online to exploit you. The more personal information you choose to share on social media, the easier it is to exploit that information. Through social media, hackers can find out information about your job, the places you frequent, and even your mother’s maiden name. But don’t worry, we’ve got a few tips up our sleeve to help you share all of the love you want across social.

Seasonal events, like Valentine’s Day, present an opportunity for cybercriminals to leverage their schemes. But don’t be deterred from sharing the love— here’s how you can connect securely and keep your data safe from hackers:

  • Get friendly with your privacy settings on your social media apps. Social platforms like Facebook are making it easier to adjust your privacy settings through a  “privacy center” so you can stay on top of the information you share and who you share it with.
  • Be careful of which accounts you link. Being connected to your online community is great, but linking accounts across platforms only gives cybercriminals easier access to your data. While Tinder does require you to link your Facebook account to sign up, you can turn off Tinder Social so that Tinder won’t be able to post anything to Facebook. And, when possible, avoid linking your dating profiles to other personal accounts.
  • Think before you click that link. Hover over it to see if the URL address looks legitimate to avoid phishing scams. If you know you didn’t send flowers, send that scam to your spam.
  • Double up on your security software. There are plenty of apps that keep your phone safe from malicious attacks. Consider using a service for your phone that offers web protection and antivirus.

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog

Are We Dating Our Devices? How Our Online Interactions Impact Our Personal Security

dating-devices-personal-security

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

L is for the way you look at your technology, O is for you’re not the only one looking at it. We L-O-V-E our connected devices, our apps, and all the online social interaction that comes with them. But unfortunately, we’re not the only ones who love them, as cybercriminals are attempting to capitalize on our connected lifestyles in order to swoop valuable personal information. Let’s explore why this is happening, how our increased device use impacts our lives, and what we can do to show our personal security some love.

Sharing data during modern dating

We love our devices largely for the connectedness and information they provide us with. For example, modern romance has shifted towards dating apps largely because these apps connect us with world quickly and easily. On these dating apps, you share information about yourself with strangers. But could you be sharing that info with strangers that aren’t even on the app? Just a few weeks ago, security researchers discovered that popular dating app Tinder still lacks basic HTTPS encryption for photos. Just by being on the same Wi-Fi network as any user of Tinder’s iOS or Android app, potential hackers could see any photo the user did, or even inject their own images into his or her photo stream. These crooks could even watch a user swipe left or right. By trying to stay connected online, these dating app users could be helping cybercriminals connect to their personal data instead.

The effects of our device devotion

Ironically enough, our efforts to engage socially online don’t exactly help us strengthen real-life relationships. In fact, we know from last year’s Connected Relationships survey that as we use our connected devices more and more each day, our relationships are negatively impacted by that use.

The Connected Relationships survey respondents said that they spend an equal amount of time at home online (38%) as they do interacting with others face-to-face. And 40% felt their significant other paid more attention to their own device when they were together one-on-one. You could even say that, for many, these devices have become the “other (wo)man” in the relationship.

Though devices have managed to cause some minor riffs between couples, that doesn’t stop couples from sharing even when they shouldn’t. Out of those surveyed, nearly 30% of couples share passwords to social media accounts, 28% share passwords to personal email accounts, and most shockingly, more than 20% share their work-specific devices and accounts with their significant other.

Spread the love to your personal security

So, whether you’re sharing your private data with a dating app, or your account info with a loved one, it’s important you show your personal security some love too. To do just that, follow these tips:

  • Limit how personal you get. Whether its Tinder, another dating app, or just any regular app, only provide the program with information that is absolutely necessary — this especially goes for financial data. Additionally, take the time to remove unnecessary personal information from your devices in general that could compromise your security. The less personal data you have on a device, the safer your information will be.
  • Make passwords a priority. Ensure your passwords are secure and strong by including numbers, lowercase and uppercase letters, as well as symbols. If you’re someone who knows the struggle with generating and remembering multiple unique passwords, use a password manager, like the True Key app. A password manager can help you create strong and secure passwords and log you into your favorite websites automatically using multi-factor authentication.
  • Focus on what really matters. We love our devices, but it’s important to disconnect every now and then to spend time with the important people in our lives, like friends and family. Don’t worry: your social networks will be right there waiting for you when you get back.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog

8 Easy Ways to Hack-Proof Your Family’s Smartphones

8-ways-hack-proof-familys-smartphones

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

Smartphones have changed the face of parenting in profound ways. But for all the efficiency they’ve introduced into family life, those same devices simultaneously bring risk.

With smartphone and tablet use growing at ten times the rate of PCs, hackers know precisely where to shift their focus these days. Cyber thieves love smartphones because once inside, they can access private information, location, email, photos, social media, and bank accounts.

If you’re a parent, a smartphone breach is an even bigger deal. Shoring up the security gaps in your phone isn’t a big deal but what about the other four or more smartphones under your roof? If you were to multiply the risk, you’d soon realize the potential havoc that’s looming.

While you can’t shut out every digital risk, you can tackle the most prominent ones. Let’s get started!

8 Ways to Hack-Proof Your Family’s Smartphones

  1. Think Like a Criminal. Work a potential hack backward. Look at every possible entryway into your phone and ask yourself, “How could I get into this phone if I were determined?” Then, methodically lock up each digital door. Challenge yourself to find every security gap. Examine your password strength, social profiles, web browsing security, general and app settings.
  2. Juice Up Your Password. How do you create a password that a criminal can’t hack? With great intention and a few extra layers. 1) Avoid the common error of using easy passwords such as “12345” or “password.” Get complex and create a combination that isn’t logical. 2) Use multi-factor authentication (MFA). Having multiple factors to authenticate your phone use such as your fingerprint, face, or a trusted device, increases security. Most smartphones offer MFA so, even if it seems tedious, use it. The more factors — or digital layers — you can combine, the more protected your smartphone will be. Too many passwords crowding your brain? Consider a password manager.
  3. Trust No App. Not all apps you download to your phone are created equal. Many third-party apps do not go through rigorous security vetting of Google or Apple. Hackers can infect apps with malware or viruses that demolish your phone’s security and allow hackers access to your data. Beware. Examine all apps, read reviews, and steer clear of apps that ask for too much access. Even legitimate apps can be used for malicious purposes such as listening in via a phone’s microphones and even spying using a phone’s camera. To pull back an app’s access, just go to your settings. On Android: Go to Apps and Notifications, choose App Permissions and make changes. On iOS: Go to your settings, select Privacy, and make changes to app permissions accordingly.
  4. Passcode, Track Your Phone. Be proactive in case your phone gets stolen or lost. Make sure your device is passcode and fingerprint protected. Take a few minutes to enable phone tracking. For Android, you’ll download the app Find My Device and for Apple use Find My iPhone. Make sure those apps are always enabled on your phone. If your phone is lost or stolen it can be tracked online.
  5. Log out, Lock Online Services. If you bank, shop, or access sensitive accounts via your smartphone do it with extreme care. This means logging out and locking those accounts when not in use and avoiding using auto-login features. Instead, use a password manager app the forces you to re-enter a master password each time you want to access an account. It’s worth the extra step. An essential part of this equation is disabling keychain and auto-fill in your browser. You can do this by finding your web browser in Settings and toggling each option to OFF. Also, avoid using public Wi-Fi for accessing sensitive accounts or conducting any transactions.
  6. Turn Off Bluetooth. Bluetooth carries inherent vulnerabilities and is another open door for hackers to enter. When Bluetooth is turned on it is constantly looking for other open connections. Hackers work quickly through open Bluetooth connections, and often victims don’t even know there’s been a breach (there’s no evidence a phone has connected with a criminal source). Make sure to switch Bluetooth off if you are not using it.
  7. Take Updates Seriously. Because people design phones, phones will be flawed. And, it’s just a matter of time before a hacker discovers and exploits those flaws. Developers use updates to combat all kinds of breaches, which make them critical to your phone’s security. Along with staying on top of updates, consider the added safeguard of antivirus, identity, and privacy protection that covers all family devices.
  8. Stop! Don’t Click that Link. Unless you are 100% sure of the legitimacy of a link sent to you through text, email, or direct message, do not click it. Random links sent by hackers to access your data are getting more and more sophisticated as well as destructive.toni page birdsongToni Birdsong is a Family Safety Evangelist to McAfee. You can find her on Twitter @McAfee_Family. (Disclosures). 

 

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog

The Legacy Continues – What Black History Month Means to Us

legacy-continues-black-history

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

At McAfee, we celebrate the diverse backgrounds of our global workforce year-round, but during the month of February, we are proud to celebrate Black History Month! McAfee has an ongoing commitment to creating a diverse and inclusive environment where employees have the freedom to bring their full, authentic selves to work.

This month we are featuring our McAfee African Heritage Community (MAHC). The MAHC is committed to delivering education, culture awareness, mentoring programs, community involvement and advancing diversity and inclusion within McAfee’s culture.

Get an inside look on what Black History Month means to our leaders of MAHC and how they’re continuing the legacy here at McAfee.

Living the Legacy at McAfee

Kristol

“As a child raised by parents of the 50’s, I am grateful for their sacrifice and fight for racial equality in the workplace. My mother was the first African American woman hired at one of the largest car manufacturing plants in Dallas, and my father retired from the same company after 36 years of dedicated service. As President of McAfee’s African Heritage Community, my goal is to spread knowledge of our culture to employees of all ethnicities and increase diversity while celebrating McAfee’s mission.”

Philip

“The celebration of Black History Month is truly a celebration of American history. There lies no separation between the two. I am proud to be a member of such a transcendent culture formed by a group of brilliant, strong, courageous, and passionate individuals whose influence has spread around the world. It is through people like my “extended work family” in the McAfee African Heritage Community that our ancestor’s legacy continues.”

Shellee

“As an African American woman, I am on a journey to continue to break down barriers for progress for black women in corporate America. I work hard to leave the “I can too” ideology upon my daughters and those around me.  McAfee is working to make strides in the realm of diversity and I am proud to be a part of our African Heritage Community which allows me a platform to do my part in lighting a path for others.”

Kendrick

“When I study our history, I see that who we are and what we represent is pure greatness. I am grateful for the sacrifices and achievements made by our ancestors and feel empowered to carry forward that same level of greatness. Working at McAfee provides me a platform to demonstrate that greatness with my fellow African Heritage Community members and help others to learn and understand our culture.”

Norma

“I am passionate about learning and educating employees about the history of my African heritage and the influence it has had in my life, America, and the world. I am grateful that McAfee has a culture that allows us to educate and share our unique perspectives with others about our culture and community. In educating ourselves and others, I hope to continue to influence an environment of inclusion at McAfee.”

Kent

“As a child of Trinidadian and Grenadian immigrants, my parents dream was to offer a better way of life for their future generations. I am proud to say that I am the embodiment of their dreams, and daily I am offered the opportunity to help debunk cultural stereotypes and leave a legacy for my future generations. Fostering diversity within McAfee creates relationships with people from different ethnicities and encourages compassion amongst peers and is a major part of what makes it a Great Place to Work.”

Edward

“I strive to be the embodiment of my ancestor’s dreams. From the bluegrass hilltops of Kentucky to the shores of Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, I am who I am because of every struggle and every sacrifice and lesson. Their legacy continues through me…I am my brother’s keeper. McAfee’s African Heritage Community gives me the opportunity to share the wisdoms, stories, successes and trials of our culture with employees and embrace the growing diversity within McAfee.”

Toni

“McAfee’s mission is noble and inspired by the power of working together and uniting to overcome the greatest challenge of the digital age—cybercrime; It’s easy to lead diversity and inclusion efforts at a company committed to making the connected world more secure. My history is a legacy of dreamers, doers, and innovators who have contributed an overwhelming amount of sacrifice so that we live a secure present and future world. I’m proud to join in with McAfee’s African Heritage Community to celebrate Black History not only in February but every day.”

Kevin

“I use Black History Month as a time of reflection on all the accomplishments by people of color that have contributed to making the world a safer and more comfortable place. For example, Garrett Morgan, inventor of the traffic light, or Dr. Mark Dean, inventor of the color PC monitor and the 1st Gigahertz chip. I’m encouraged seeing the next generation understand that they too can leave a positive impact on our world regardless of race, gender, or religion.”

 

For more stories like this, follow @LifeAtMcAfee on Instagram and on Twitter @McAfee to see what working at McAfee is all about.

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog

Meltdown and Spectre Aren’t Done Just Yet – New Malware Uses Exploits to Potentially Attack Browsers

meltdown-spectre-potentially

 Tags :- www.mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com/activate | mcafee.com activate | McAfee com activate | activate McAfee | McAfee Activate | McAfee Retail Card.

We kicked off 2018 with two powerful new exploits: Meltdown and Spectre. And since the discovery of Meltdown and Spectre on January 3rd, vendors have been hard at work issuing patches to remedy their nasty side effects – with the majority supplying fixes within the first week. But, unfortunately, some malware makers have still found ways to leverage a handful of these exploits. In fact, according to the AV-Test Institute, there are currently 139 malware samples out in the wild that appear to be related to the recently reported CPU exploits and have been designed to attack web browsers running JavaScript.

So, why is this still happening? Though operating system vendors, chip makers, and browser makers have released patches to mitigate the attacks, that doesn’t exactly mean all systems everywhere have been locked down, especially as new malware strains continue to emerge. In fact, the CVE-2017-5715, CVE-2017-5753, and CVE-2017-5754 exploits are still being abused by cybercriminals, who are leveraging them to potentially attack browsers that support JavaScript and WebAssembly.

What’s more – if they successfully infiltrate these browsers, cybercriminals can steal passwords and other personal data. So, it’s crucial users are vigilant and take the necessary precautions to secure their personal info while surfing the web. To do just that, follow these tips:

  • Exit out of your browser window. If you’re not actively using your browser window, close it. This should decrease your chances for attack and also conserve energy in the process.
  • Update everything regularly. Along with updating every type of device impacted by Meltdown and Spectre, be sure to update your browser as soon as an update becomes available. That way, you can apply any additional patches that are created to combat these new malware attacks.
  • Surf the web safely. As I noted in my last post about Meltdown and Spectre, McAfee products are not affected by this exploit. Therefore, after you’ve updated your devices with the latest security software, it’s time to take the next step in personal security by locking down your browser as well. You can do that by installing McAfee WebAdvisor, which acts your own personal safety advisor for your online activity.

Source : Securingtomorrow.mcafee.com

McAfee.com/activate : Blog