Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware


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Imagine a job that changes every day of your life, where you get to do something new each week – that’s what it’s like working in the cybersecurity industry. For me, this is ideal—smarter adversaries, new challenges, and the constant struggle to predict and prepare for the future of security in information technology makes this feel a lot less like work. However, it’s important to remember that we do this only because people are getting hurt, often literally. And that’s a sobering and humbling perspective. In many scenarios, a successful campaign can have drastic effects on the victims’ lifestyles and finances. In today’s example, the victims, point-of-sale systems, are being attacked by a POS malware and are being targeted for identity and financial theft.

This particular attack leveraged a POS malware dubbed UDPoS, aptly named for its somewhat uncommon data exfiltration method over UDP, specifically via DNS queries. Although this malware is definitely not the first of its kind (see Multigrain POS malware, DNSMessenger), it certainly is an uncommon technique, and intelligent in that many organizations deprioritize DNS traffic for inspection as compared to HTTP and FTP. Coupled with the fact that UDPoS allegedly leverages a popular remote desktop service known as LogMeIn, and you have a malware campaign that could have a broad reach of victims (in this case unpatched or dated POS systems), and a unique ability to avoid detection for data exfiltration.

Although uncommon, and perhaps somewhat covert in its ability to transmit data over DNS, this malware does offer an upside for defenders — attackers will continue to use protocols which do not employ encryption. The move to SSL or other encryption methods for data exfiltration has been surprisingly inconsistent, meaning detection is relatively simple. This makes the need for communication and visibility of these kinds of techniques essential.

As defenders, McAfee’s Advanced Threat Research team actively monitors the threat landscape and tracks both new and current techniques for every stage of malware—from reconnaissance to infection, lateral movement, persistence, command and control, and exfiltration. We will stay closely tuned to determine if this technique grows in popularity or evolves in capabilities.

We are constantly playing a game of cat and mouse with the adversaries. As we adapt, protect, and attempt to predict new methods of malicious activity, we can be certain the same efforts are being made to evade and outsmart us. Our challenge as a security community is to work together, learn from each other, and apply these learnings toward recognizing and mitigating new threats, such as the DNS exfiltration method employed by UDPoS.

Source : : Blog

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